CSDE-eNews Bulletin

February 7, 2012

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CSDE WEEKLY SEMINAR
CSDE AFFILIATE & TRAINEE NEWS
CAMPUS SEMINARS & EVENTS OF INTEREST
FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES
CONFERENCES
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST

CSDE WEEKLY SEMINAR

Betsy Evans - Seattle to Spokane: Mapping Perceptions of English in Washington State

Betsy Evans, UW, Linguistics
“Seattle to Spokane: Mapping Perceptions of English in Washington State”

Matt Dunbar, CSDE GIS Specialist, is a co-presenter.

February 10, 2012
12:30 - 1:30 pm
Raitt 121

CSDE Seminar Schedule

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CSDE AFFILIATE & TRAINEE NEWS

Seattle Times Columnist on The Changing Face of American Poverty Roundtable Discussion

Robert Plotnick, Marcia Meyers, Rachel Kleit and Marieka Klawitter were all cited by Seattle Times columnist Jerry Large in his February 5 column. Read the full article here.

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CAMPUS SEMINARS & EVENTS OF INTEREST

Scott Emerson – The Use of Screening Studies in the Identification of Disease Risk Factors

UW Epidemiology Seminar Series
Scott Emerson, MD, PhD, Professor of Biostatistics
"The Use of Screening Studies in the Efficient and Accurate Identification of Disease Risk Factors and Effective Therapies"

Tuesday, February 7, 2012
3:30 - 4:50 pm
Health Sciences K-069

For the abstract, please go here.

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Adrian E. Raftery - Fast Inference for Model-Based Clustering of Networks

CSSS Seminar Series
Adrian E. Raftery, Professor, Departments of Statistics and Sociology and CSDE Affiliate
“Fast Inference for Model-Based Clustering of Networks Using an Approximate Case-Control Likelihood”


Wednesday February 8, 2012
12:30 - 1:30 pm
 Savery 409

For the abstract, please go here.

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Joaquin Blaum - Wealth Inequality and the Losses from Financial Frictions

UW Dept. of Economics Seminar       
Joaquin Blaum, MIT
“Wealth Inequality and the Losses from Financial Frictions”

Wednesday, February 8, 2012           
2:00 pm
Savery 410

Abstract:
Does wealth inequality exacerbate or alleviate the degree of misallocation in an economy where financial markets are imperfect? To address this question, I exploit the idea that inequality should have a different effect across sectors. Using a difference-in-difference strategy, I show that sectors that are more in need of external finance are relatively smaller in countries with higher income inequality. To rationalize this fact, I build a model in which sectors differ in their fixed cost requirement, agents face collateral constraints, and production is subject to decreasing returns. The model features key elements from the literature on financial frictions and economic development. I calibrate the model to match standard moments of the US economy. The calibrated model is consistent with the documented facts on inequality and cross-sector outcomes. At the calibrated parameters, wealth inequality exacerbates the effect of financial frictions on the economy. Quantitatively, an increase in wealth inequality that is consistent with an increase in income inequality of 15 points in Gini generates losses of 46 percent of per capita income.

The full paper can be found here.

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Elizabeth Fussell - The Deportation Threat Dynamic and Victimization of Latino Migrants

UW Dept. of Sociology Colloquium Series
Elizabeth Fussell, Associate Professor, Sociology, WSU, and CSDE Affiliate
“The Deportation Threat Dynamic and Victimization of Latino Migrants: Wage Theft and Robbery”

Wednesday, February 8, 2012
3:30 - 5:00 pm
Savery 409

For the abstract, please go here.

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Michael Skinner - Environmental Induction of Epigenetic Inheritance of Disease

Environmental Health Seminar
Michael Skinner, PhD, Professor, School of Biological Sciences, WSU
“Environmental Induction of Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease: Ancestral Ghosts in Your Genome”

Thursday, February 9, 2012
12:30 - 1:20 pm
Magnuson Health Sciences Building, D-209

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Crystal Wong - Does Investment in Marital Public Goods Stabilize Contemporary Marriages?

UW Dept. of Economics Brown Bag Seminar
Crystal Wong
“Does Investment in Marital Public Goods Stabilize Contemporary Marriages? Evidence from US Census Data”

Thursday, February 9, 2012
12:30 pm
Savery 410

Abstract:
This paper investigates how marital investment, in particular home assets affect divorce rates. Variation in property tax rates across counties in different states is used as an instrument for household asset investment. I find that an increase in one percent in home value serving as a proxy for the amount of marital investment would lower divorce rate for 2 percent for non-black individuals in the United States. Such relationship however does not hold for the black population. Also, when confining the analysis to middle-aged nonblack individuals without children, a one percent increase in investment in home asset would lower divorce rates by 7 percent and no such relationship is found for their black counterparts. This suggests the two racial groups might have divergent economic consideration for marriage formation. The contemporary family model of public good sharing appears to explain very well for the behavior of non-black couples. The results provide empirical evidence supporting the theoretical framework of saving behavior of households under contemporary marriage I develop in another paper.

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Benjamin Trumble - Testosterone, Energetics and Male Life History

IPEM Seminar Series
Benjamin Trumble, Ph.D. student, UW, Anthropology Department and CSDE Trainee
“Testosterone, Energetics and Male Life History”

Thursday, February 9, 2012
3:30 - 5:00 pm
Mary Gates Hall, Room 271

For the abstract, please go here.

For the full Winter 2012 schedule of the IPEM Seminar Series, please go here.

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Hal Varian - Predicting the Present with Google Trends

UW Computer Science and Engineering Colloquium
Hal Varian, Chief Economist at Google and Emeritus Professor, UC Berkeley
“Predicting the Present with Google Trends”

Thursday, February 9, 2012
3:30 pm
Electrical Engineering Building, Room 105

Abstract:
It is now possible to acquire real time information on economic variables using various commercial sources.  I illustrate how one can use Google Trends data to measure the state of the economy in various sectors, and discuss some of the implications for research and policy.

This lecture will also be broadcast live via the Internet. Please go here for more information about streaming this lecture.

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Katie Fitzpatrick - The Role of Advertising in the Growth of the SNAP Caseload

WCPC Seminar
Katie Fitzpatrick, Assistant Professor of Economics, Seattle University
"The Role of Advertising in the Growth of the SNAP Caseload”

Monday, February 13
12:30 - 1:20 pm
Parrington Hall Commons, Room 308

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Michael Perez - TBA

UW Dept. of Anthropology Sociocultural Colloquium
Michael Perez
TBA

Monday, February 13, 2012
3:30 - 5:00 pm
Denny Hall 401

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Understanding the Brain and How We Hear: Insights from Our Fish Ancestors

2012 Allen L. Edwards Psychology Lecture Series
Joseph Sisneros, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, UW
Richard Fay, Distinguished University Research Professor of Psychology, Loyola University Chicago (Emeritus) and Whitman Investigator at the Marine Biological Laboratory

Wednesday, February 22, 2012
7:00 - 9:00 pm
Kane Hall 120

Fish represent perhaps the earliest and simplest examples of how the vertebrate auditory system detects and identifies biologically relevant sounds that are critical for survival. Drs. Sisneros and Fay will discuss studies that provide important insight into the origins, adaptations and evolution of the vertebrate auditory system for sound detection and communication.

For the full schedule of the 2012 Allen L. Edwards Psychology Lecture Series and to register to attend, please go here.

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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

Limited Submission: USAID University Engagement through Higher Education Institutions

Please see below for information on this opportunity for new research centers/consortiums.  This is a quick turn-around, and the internal deadline at OR for Letters of Intent is Wednesday, February 15, 2012.  Note that UW is limited in amount of submissions (to two for single institutional centers, or one for consortiums).  A quick summary from Lynne Chronister, Director of OSP, says this:

 “… USAID wants to reinvigorate their connection with research universities, and will start by offering $100 million to universities to study “to study foreign aid and generate solutions to problems facing the developing world, like lack of adequate food resources, government corruption, and environmental degradation.”  USAID is hoping universities will provide a multidisciplinary approach to solving some of the world’s development issues.”

Thanks,
Vicky Palm
A&S Dean’s Office

Sponsor: USAID
Program: University Engagement through Higher Education Institutions
Program Number: RFA-0AA-12-000004

Funding amount: USAID anticipates funding Consortium Centers at between $4-5 million per year and Single Institution Centers at between $1-2 million per year. Application above a maximum amount of US$25 million for Consortium Centers and US$10 million for other Centers will not be considered.

Number of applications UW can submit: Single institution applicants may submit two applications, whereas consortium leads may only submit one application as a consortium. Institutions are free to form as many inter-institutional collaborations as consortium partners that they view appropriate and programmatically justified.

UW internal deadline: 2/15/12
OSP Deadline: 3/27/12
Full proposals due to sponsor: 4/3/12

Purpose:

The President’s Policy Directive on Development (PPD 6) highlighted the importance of partnership, innovation, and science and technology to achieve development objectives. The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is taking a new catalytic approach to solving major development challenges. This involves harnessing the intellectual power of faculty, students, and staff in great academic institutions to define and solve some of the world’s most challenging development problems, to sustain creative, evidence-based multidisciplinary approaches to international development, and to expand the role of science, technology, and engineering to solving complex development problems. Specifically, the Office of Science & Technology (S&T) is seeking creative, science-based approaches that are directed toward the Core Development Objectives outlined in USAID's 2011-2015 Policy Framework, which can be found electronically here.

Eligibility:
Applicants are encouraged to ‘think outside of the box’, using creative practices and methodologies to develop innovations clearly linked to these objectives that are both sustainable, scalable, and would address the developing world’s ability to address these problems. Successful applicants will become part of a networked set of “Centers” that bring creative problem solving, analysis, and engagement to USAID’s core development practice. See the attached DRAFT RFA for more specific detail.

Successful applicants will bring creative, multi-disciplinary approaches to USAID’s development practice while engaging faculty, staff and student communities, and will become part of a networked set of centers that bring creative problem-solving, analysis and engagement to USAID’s core development practice. These centers will articulate development problems and identify, create and/or evaluate novel solutions. 
 
 USAID will fund two types of centers that will further knowledge of development and engage with a broad range of actors:

Consortium centers will be robust collaborative consortia of institutions of higher education and other non-profit or for-profit organizations that complement each other’s strengths and undertake efforts that a single entity or smaller network would find difficult to impossible to accomplish. All consortia will be strongly encouraged to include developing country institutions or research institutions. The consortia should provide greater value together through their interactions than as individual institutions. Single institution centers will involve a single higher education institution.

 Pre-Proposal Instructions:
Please submit a one-page letter of intent, identifying the general theme, the key players, any external partners, and a brief paragraph on how you  would manage the 1:1 expectation for leveraging of resources (which includes institutional commitment, but may also be private partnerships, gifts,  foundations, etc.), by email to Office of Research at research@uw.edu by 5:00 PM Thursday, February 15, 2012. Full applications are due to the sponsor 4/3/12 so you will need to have your proposal to the Office of Sponsored Programs by 3/27/12 for processing if given the go ahead by the Proposal Review Committee. The internal Proposal Review Committee review and selection process is outlined here.

Please feel free to email us information on any limited submission opportunities that should be but are not already listed here.

The RFA draft can be found here.

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Modeling Social Behavior (R01)

(RFA-GM-13-006)
National Institute of General Medical Sciences
National Institute of Mental Health
Application Receipt Date(s): April 03, 2012

This FOA, issued by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), solicits applications for developing and testing innovative theories and computational, mathematical, or engineering approaches to deepen our understanding of complex social behavior. This research will examine phenomena at multiple scales to address the emergence of collective behaviors that arise from individual elements or parts of a system working together.  This FOA will support research that explores the often complex and dynamical relationships among the parts of a system and between the system and its environment in order to understand the system as a whole.

To accomplish the goals of this FOA we encourage applications that build transdisciplinary teams of scientists spanning a broad range of expertise. Minimally this team should include senior investigators with expertise in the behavioral or social sciences as well as in computational and systems thinking (computer science, mathematics, engineering, systems-level methodology). Research can involve model organisms or humans. The FOA will support small research projects focusing on theory building and testing, development and testing of innovative methods or methodological approaches, as well as small infrastructure projects focusing on development and testing of shared resources (in the context of a driving biological, basic behavioral or social, or human health issue). The FOA also will fund larger and more integrative research projects focusing on the modeling of complex social behavior.

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CONFERENCES

Alaska Anthropological Association - Annual Conference at UW February 29 - March 3

The 39th Annual Meeting of the Alaskan Anthropological Association, hosted by the UW Department of Anthropology and the Burke Museum, will be held from February 29 to March 3, 2012. Opening Reception in the Burke Room at the Burke Museum, Feb 29th from 6:00 – 9:00 pm. Conference proceedings at Hotel Deca, March 1-3.

For details and registration, please go here.

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

NICHD Associate Director for Extramural Research - Bethesda, MD

The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), a major research component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), seeks to identify an exceptional and visionary leader to serve as the Institute's Associate Director for Extramural Research. This is a senior leadership position within the NICHD, involving the management of scientific, policy and administrative matters of the extramural research programs of the Institute. The incumbent oversees the activities of the Institute's extramural research programs and manages scientific peer review, award, and post-award activities related to research, development, and training grants and contracts in maternal and child health, family health and well-being, and medical rehabilitation.

For the full posting, please go here.

Application deadline is March 1, 2012.

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Assistant Professor, Economist of Education - University of California, Los Angeles

The UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies seeks a political economist of education who is policy oriented, with an agenda focusing on specific questions related to poverty, inequality, and equity and how socio-economic policies may affect education policy and practice.

 For the full posting, please go here.

Application deadline is March 19, 2012.

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TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

William T. Grant Foundation - William T. Grant Scholars

This program supports promising early-career scholars from diverse disciplines whose research is interdisciplinary and examines young people (ages 8-25) in social, institutional, community, and cultural contexts.  Nominees must be within seven years of receipt of their terminal degree at time of application; they need not be tenure-track.  Four to six W.T. Grant Scholars are selected nationwide, and each receives $350,000 distributed over a five-year period.

Only one candidate may be nominated in one year from any major division of a university.  Please submit a nominating statement to research@uw.edu by 5:00 pm on Thursday March 8, 2012 and inform your Divisional Dean of your pre-proposal submission. The full proposal is due to the W.T. Grant Foundation by July 3, 2012.

For the full announcement, please go here.

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OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST

Census Bureau to Release 2010 Census Summary File 2 for Washington

This week, the U.S. Census Bureau will release the 2010 Census Summary File 2 for Florida, Massachusetts, Mississippi and Washington. During December through April, the Census Bureau will provide statistics for states on a flow basis. These Summary File 2 tables will add a new layer of detail to the population and housing topics released last year from the 2010 Census. Information, such as relationship and homeownership, previously available only for an area’s entire population will now be available for specific race and ethnic groups in that community.

Summary File 2 will be available for up to 331 population groups and each of the 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. The information will be available for a variety of geographic areas, down to the census tract level.

The Summary File 2 for these states will be available on an embargoed basis for accredited media who are registered for access Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 10 a.m. The embargo will be lifted and the information released publicly Thursday, Feb. 9 at 12:01 a.m.

To apply for embargo access, click here and click on “Embargoed Releases.” Please review the Embargo Policy carefully before submitting the embargo registration form.

For more information about the release of Summary File 2, please go here.

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Formal Demography Workshop - Stanford University, May 21 – 24, 2012

The Stanford Centers for Population Research, and the Demography and Economics of Health & Aging, announce a workshop on Formal Demography. Lecturers will present methods and theory from demography, evolutionary ecology, and quantitative genetics.

Applications are invited from advanced students/postdocs/junior faculty for this 3.5-day workshop in Formal Demography. The application deadline is March 15, 2012.

For application details and more information, please go here.

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Population Reference Bureau Web Update

The PRB has updated its website, including an article on China's "one-child" population policy.

Read the full article and view other new content here.

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The National Institutes of Health publishes January issue of Extramural Nexus

The newest issue of the NIH Extramural Nexus includes 2011 Success Rates, Research Workforce Responses, and NCATS Transition.

Read the full content here.

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