Seminar Series - Spring 2014


Next Seminar

Friday, April 18, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121

Mike Babb & Mark Ellis

Accessing the Resources of the Northwest Census Research Data Center

A Census Research Data Center (RDC) (soon to be renamed Federal Statistical System Research Data Center)is a dedicated lab space that provides access to a large range of federal restricted-use datasets from multiple agencies including tax, census, health, environment employment/industry and assorted other administrative records. These data include individual, employer, health, and environmental data unavailable in public data. Many of these datasets provide unique opportunities to study relationships between a variety of social, economic, environmental and health processes/outcomes at micro spatial scales with individual, commercial or institutional data. RDC's are coordinated by the Center for Economic Studies at the US Census Bureau and the Northwest Census Research Data Center is the UW's RDC. This talk will survey the restricted-use data resources available through the Northwest Census Research Data Center. It will also provide an overview of the procedures required to get approval to access these data in the lab.

 
 
Listing of past seminars

Spring 2014 Seminar Schedule

April 11, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121


Susan Cassels

Migration, Sexual Networks, and HIV in Ghana: Testing the Bridging Hypothesis

I will present some ongoing work that addresses how migration & human mobility may affect sexual network structure and the spread of HIV. I hypothesize that the geographic movement of people, in addition to selective partner choice, is a key driver of continued or enhanced HIV transmission at a population level. Migrants are often viewed as having high-risk sexual behavior, but the association between short-term mobility and behavior can be confounded by the qualities of movement, destination, and reason. Additionally, cross-sectional studies are often unable to align episodes of mobility with sexual behavior outcomes. We use data from the Migration & HIV in Ghana (MHG) study, a cross-¬sectional study of sexually active adults in Agbogbloshie, Ghana in 2012, combining 1-year retrospective relationship history calendar with frequency, duration, destination and reasons for travel in the last year, to test associations between mobility and sexual behavior. Mobility was common i! n our study population, with 75% of men and 78% of women reporting overnight travel in the last year. Additionally, 35% of men and 6.5% of women reported a concurrent sexual partnership in the last year. We find that the relationship between short-term mobility and sexual risk behavior differs significantly by sex of the migrant as well as destination.





April 18, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121


Mike Babb & Mark Ellis

Accessing the Resources of the Northwest Census Research Data Center

A Census Research Data Center (RDC) (soon to be renamed Federal Statistical System Research Data Center)is a dedicated lab space that provides access to a large range of federal restricted-use datasets from multiple agencies including tax, census, health, environment employment/industry and assorted other administrative records. These data include individual, employer, health, and environmental data unavailable in public data. Many of these datasets provide unique opportunities to study relationships between a variety of social, economic, environmental and health processes/outcomes at micro spatial scales with individual, commercial or institutional data. RDC's are coordinated by the Center for Economic Studies at the US Census Bureau and the Northwest Census Research Data Center is the UW's RDC. This talk will survey the restricted-use data resources available through the Northwest Census Research Data Center. It will also provide an overview of the procedures required to get approval to access these data in the lab.





April 25, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121


Tim Thomas, Cara Margherio & Amy Spring

CSDE Trainee PAA Conference Presentations

Join CSDE Trainees Tim Thomas, Cara Margherio and Amy Spring and hear the work that they will be presenting at the 2014 Population Association of America Conference.

Spatial Methods for Quantifying Crime Displacement after a Hot-Spot Intervention (Thomas)

HIV/AIDS and the Breakdown of Marriage among Women in Rural South Africa (Margherio)

Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Foreclosure Diffusion during the Great Recession (Spring)*
*This work is co-authored by Matthew Hall, Cornell University and Kyle Crowder, University of Washington.





May 2, 2014

No Seminar This Week

No seminar this week due to Population Association of America (PAA) Conference.





May 9, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121


Jack DeWaard

University of Minnesota - Minnesota Population Center

Demographic Signatures of Migration Systems: Population Recovery After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Recent studies suggest that Hurricanes Katrina and Rita altered the structure and dynamics of the U.S. migration system in ways that promoted population recovery in disaster-affected areas. If so, then these changes should be reflected in the underlying demographic signature of the U.S. migration system. We test this idea by comparing the stable equivalent distribution of the U.S. population that is implied from the observed system of migration flows in the period after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita to the distribution that is implied from the system of migration flows before these disasters. We then test to see whether changes to the underlying demographic signature of the U.S. migration system exhibit patterning consistent with, what we call, a vulnerability gradient. We close by replicating the steps above for each year within the recovery period to determine whether population recovery in disaster-affected areas has accelerated or decelerated over time.

*This work is co-authored by Katherine J. Curtis, University of Wisconsin-Madison
and Elizabeth Fussell, Washington State University (Brown University Fall 2014)





May 16, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121


Timothy Gage

University at Albany SUNY - Center for Social & Demographic Analysis

TBA





May 23, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121


Filiz Garip

Harvard University

TBA





May 30, 2014
12:30-1:30 pm
Raitt Hall - Room 121


Christopher Carpenter

Vanderbilt University

The Mechanisms of Alcohol Control

A substantial economics literature documents that tighter alcohol controls reduce alcohol related harms, but far less is known about mechanisms. We use the universe of Canadian mortality records to document that Canada’s Minimum Legal Drinking Age significantly reduces mortality rates of young men but has much smaller effects on women. Using drinking data that are far more detailed than in prior work, we show that this gender-specific mortality pattern is likely due to the MLDA reducing ‘extreme’ drinking among young men (i.e., 10+ drinks on one day). Our results suggest that alcohol control efforts should focus on moderating extreme drinking behavior.

*This work is co-authored by Carols Dobkin, University of California, Santa Cruz
and Casey Warman, Dalhousie University