Postdoc Alumni



Laith Abu-Raddad

The core of my research interests is mathematical modeling of infectious diseases. The central theme is the study of the interaction between variables that determine the typical course of infection in a community of hosts. Although my interests span a wide scope of infectious agents, my main current focus is on HIV/AIDS where I study the role of vaccination and treatment protocols in controlling the spread of HIV. Furthermore, I have keen interest in the interaction of HIV and other diseases such as malaria and herpes. Other areas of interest include the dynamics of multiple strain pathogens such as influenza and malaria and the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases especially as it relates to demographic structure of human and animal populations. In terms formalism, it ranges from deterministic epidemic and population models to individual-based stochastic and network methods.

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Susan Cassels

My principle area of interest is demographic and health outcomes of interactions between social and environmental change, human behavior, and disease transmission. I completed my doctorate in demography from the Office of Population Research at Princeton University in 2005. My dissertation modeled the process of labor migration and disease transmission to see which behavioral aspects were the most important determinants of disease transmission. Susan is currently assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology, UW, with a joint appointment in the department of Global Health.

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Allison Dunne

Allisonís broad research interests are in social stratification and comparative sociology. Her primary area of research is educational differentiation and its relationship with educational opportunity for students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds. Her current research examines how the effect of school socio-economic composition on student achievement varies depending on how a country sorts their students for instruction. This research involves using the Programme for International Student Assessment, a comparative dataset of 15 year old students in all OECD countries and some partner countries.

DEPT : Sociology
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Chris Fowler

My research focuses on issues of equity in local economic development policies. For my dissertation I looked at so-called 'competitive' policies in Italian container ports combining qualitative research and agent-based modeling techniques to examine the role of discourse, institutions, and geography on the distribution of costs and benefits associated with policies that were represented as purely economic choices. More recently I have published work that tests the behavior of the Core-Periphery model (most closely associated with Paul Krugman and his collaborators) when the assumption of general equilibrium is relaxed. This model is increasingly being used as a tool for decision-making in the context of economic development policy, and my work suggests that the model is not robust to the relaxation of this assumption under most real-world conditions. In my previous position as a post doc with the Community Development Project at the Evans School of Public Affairs I worked on a range of projects intended to advise the Northwest Area Foundation on practices for reducing poverty through local economic development policy. My work included studies of industrial clusters, workforce development, and access to financial services. These topics in applied poverty research have spurred an interest in applying spatial statistical techniques in my own work, thereby leading to my current post supporting applied spatial statistics here at CSDE. I earned my PhD in Geography from the University of Washington in 2007.

DEPT : CSDE
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WEB : http://faculty.washington.edu/csfowler



Steven Goodreau



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WEB : http://faculty.washington.edu/goodreau/



Ylva Hernlund

I have been doing research in The Gambia, West Africa since 1988, focusing on local reactions to campaigns against female genital cutting (FGC). I videotaped Gambia's first set of alternative rituals, 'initiation without mutilation,' in 1998. I am now a Research Associate through CSDE, involved in a three-year NSF-funded study with Bettina Shell-Duncan, which uses quantitative and qualitative methods to examine decision making around FGC and uses a local team of field workers. I am affiliated with Gambia College and Cheik Anta Diop University, Dakar, Senegal.

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Roxanne Kerani

Post-doctoral Fellow, Center for AIDS and STD



Shoko Konishi

I have conducted several studies on Tongans in the South Pacific, exploring demographic change associated with international migration and diet, with a focus on obesity. My current research project examines the impact of nutritional status (including under-weight, over weight, and diet composition) on reproduction, and the validation of biomarkers to study nutrition-reproduction relationships. For this research I compare Japanese women in Japan with those who recently migrated to the US.

DEPT : Anthropology
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Anthony (Tony) Perez

Tony recently arrived at the UW to begin a two year postdoc on Charles Hirschman's NICHD project "Concepts and Measures of Race and Ethnic Identities." Tony just completed a joint Ph.D. in Sociology and in Public Policy at the University of Michigan, where he studied with Yu Xie, David Harris, and Sheldon Danziger, among others. Tony's research interests include race and ethnicity, social demography, and statistical methods with a particular emphasis on causal inference. He just defended his dissertation, which is entitled "Muddy Waters: The Fluidity and Complexity of Racial and Ethnic Identification in the U.S." In his thesis, Tony tests a number of hypotheses from the social construction of race literature using Census, CPS, and Add Health data. He shows, for example, that the race, gender, and householder status of survey respondents has a strong influence on the racial classification of children in interracial households. He has published papers in the Journal of Black Studies and in Health, Education, and Behavior, and has several more under review, including one entitled "Hispanic Today, Gone Tomorrow: Locating Ethnic Identity among Latino/a Youth."

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Mary Shenk

My postdoc is funded by an Individual National Research Service Award from NIH under which I will be working with Shelly Lundberg from Economics and Darryl Holman from Anthropology as well as undertaking further training in microeconomic and demographic methodology. My current and future postdoctoral research focuses on comparing models of dowry inflation from anthropology with those from demography and economics, modeling the demographic transition and marital demographics in Bangladesh, and working on developing general models of marriage systems that incorporate the logic of behavioral ecology. My dissertation research focused on the economics of marriage and parental investment in South India, where I did field research in the city of Bangalore (Karnataka State) from 2001-2002. While in the field I was affiliated with the Institute for Social and Economic Change in Bangalore.

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Bryan Sykes

My research focuses on the intersection of demography, incarceration/crime, and inequality. I am a National Science Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellow, and I completed a joint Ph.D. in Sociology and Demography from the University of California-Berkeley in 2007. My current projects and collaborations examine the causal nature of residential segregation and crime; the causal effects of incarceration on male fertility; the demographic implications of the prison boom; and the effects of racial misclassification on women's earnings. Bryan is an assistant professor of sociology at DePaul University.

DEPT : Sociology
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Kieu-Zung Vu

My research interest is international migration and marriage. In particular, I am interested in the adaptation process of interracial marriages among Asian-American where the ethnicity is one of the key indicators to measure the well-being of women and children. The analysis would be done for comparison between different groups of Asian-White and Asian-Asian, and between the first 3 generations.

DEPT : Sociology
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