Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology

Emmanuela Gakidou

Professor, School of Medicine: Global Health, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME)
University of Washington
Tel: 206-897-2810 Box: 358210
website



Emmanuela Gakidou, MSc, PhD, is Professor of Health Metrics Sciences and Senior Director of Organizational Development and Training at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) at the University of Washington. She is also a Faculty Affiliate for the Center for Statistics and the Social Sciences at the University of Washington.

Dr. Gakidou’s research interests focus on impact evaluation, methods, and tools development for analytical challenges in global health. Examples of current research projects include the evaluation of community-based interventions to improve non-communicable disease management in underserved populations, the assessment of facility efficiency in the provision of health services, and the measurement of poverty and educational attainment at the small area level.

A founding member of IHME, Dr. Gakidou oversees the Organizational Development and Training team as they strengthen and support our high-achieving, diverse, and ambitious staff. She is passionate about training the next generation of leaders in the field of health metrics and evaluation both at the University of Washington and around the world, and enjoys mentoring and teaching.

Before joining IHME, Dr. Gakidou was a research associate at the Harvard Initiative for Global Health and the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Prior to moving to Harvard University, Dr. Gakidou worked as a health economist at the World Health Organization (WHO), where she led work on the measurement of health inequalities.

Originally from Greece, Dr. Gakidou moved to the US for higher education and received her degrees – a BA, a Master of International Health Economics, and a PhD in Health Policy – from Harvard University.

IHME was established at the University of Washington in Seattle in 2007. Its mission is to improve health through better health evidence.