Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology

Biological Anthropology Talks

Posted: 2/6/2017 (Local Events)

Biological Anthropologists will be on campus and delivering talks over the coming weeks. The following are currently scheduled:

Tamar Carter: 13-14 Feb.
Melissa Liebert: 16-17 Feb.

Tamar E. Carter has a Ph.D. (2015) in Genetics and Genomics, from U FL, Gainesville. She also has an MPH (epidemiology concentration) from Gainesville. Dr. Carter is currently a postdoctoral fellow at UNC, Charlotte in Bioinfomatics and Genomics. Her research interests are in human and malaria parasite genetic diversity. Her dissertation research in Haiti was an investigation of genetic adaptations (red blood cell abnormalities) that confer resistance to malaria. She also investigated the way humans have shaped, through malaria control, the genetic diversity of malaria parasites. Her postdoctoral work has taken her research into Ethiopian populations, where the dynamics of malaria transmission are more complex. Dr. Carter’s research involves laboratory-based genetic analyses as well as statistical and data-intensive methods in genetics.

Melissa A. Liebert has a Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology (2016) from the U. Oregon. She is now a postdoctoral scholar at the U. Oregon in the Anthropology department. Her research interests are stress and economic development in subsistence-based populations. Her dissertation research was a field and laboratory-based investigation of the effects of economic development on the health and well-being of Indigenous Shuar of Ecuador. Her work integrates not only field collection and laboratory analysis of stress biomarkers, but ethnographic data and demographic analysis. In addition to her work on the Shuar, she has been participating for over five years in the World Health Organization’s Study on global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE) as a database manager and statistical analyst.

For more information, contact Patricia Kramer.

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Date: 02/13/2017

Location: University of Washington